Hayarkon River
AKA The Yarkon River.


This item was last updated in: 10/5/2009.

  • The river flows 27.5 km, from the Hayarkon sources (Rosh Hayin springs) at the east, to its estuary in the Mediterranean Sea at the west, next to Tel-Aviv port.
  • The river is the largest among the shore rivers of Israel.
  • Until the 50's, the streamflow of the river was approximately 220 million cubic meters per year. In 1954, a water carrier was built to supply water from the river to the Negev Desert, since then, most of the river water has been transferred to the carrier pipeline in order to supply drinking water. The current streamflow of the river is about 0.8% of the original one.
  • Despite the decline of the streamflow, the river is surrounded by green scenery, which creates one of the most cherished landscapes of Tel Aviv metropolis area.
  • Except Tel Aviv, the river flows through the municipal areas of Ramat Gan, Bney Brak, Petach Tikva, Ramat Hasharon, Hod Hasharon and the regional council of Drom Hasharon.
  • Situated along the river are some historic sites, such as the famous "Jarisa" gristmill, the larger "Hadar" gristmill east of it and several other sites, located beside the river, outside of Tel Aviv.
  • The average slope of the river is approximately 0.6 thousandth.
  • The river drains water from an area, ranging from Judea and Samaria mountains to the Mediterranean Sea. The river has several tributaries, which mostly start at the mountainous regions and flow to Hashfela district and the shoreline regions.
  • In the 50's and 60's, the river was severely damaged by the construction and development boom in the adjacent urban areas. In the 80's, the river became heavily polluted by sewage water and large amount of waste. Hayarkon River Authority was established in 1988 in order to rehabilitate the river and improve its conditions. The authority gathers experts for environmental issues and river rehabilitation and members of several local authorities. The waste was removed from the river in the beginning of 90's, in spite of this, the river is still polluted and there is much left to be done in order to clean it.
  • The east segment of the river is cleaned and rehabilitated, while the middle segment, from Kana River to "Sheva Tachanot" waterfall, is the most polluted and the west segment is partly polluted, due to the mixture with unpolluted sea water.
  • Many species of fish exist along the entire river. Certain species were moved from the river to breeding pools in the zoological garden of Tel Aviv university in order to be preserved.
  • The river is currently exploited for leisure and recreation attractions, swimming in the water is forbidden according to the ministry of health. The floating between Hayarkon estuary in the west and "Sheva Tachanot" waterfall in the east is available by renting motor or row boats.
  • In the far past, about 3,500 years ago, SHIPS used to sail in the river. Hayarkon river was a major sailing route, linking between an adjacent town (currently, Tel Jarisa) and the rest of the world. Over the years, the river became choked with silt and got shallow. At that time, the goods were transported by rafts and smaller boats.
  • Currently, two paved bicycle trails, cross along the river only in the territory of Hayarkon Park. The trail, outside the park, is simply an unpaved path. There is a plan to pave a bicycle track along the entire river, from Hayarkon sources to its estuary. The construction of the trail is included in "The Developing of East Hayarkon Park" project. The bicycle track will be linked to suburban residential areas by trail net, linking between neighborhoods and Hayarkon Park. The total length of the trails will be 111 km. The bicycle track will be built at a width of 3 meters by an environment friendly stone-paving technology (the method includes the use of building debris and pulverized soil and trees). A signposting for pedestrians and cyclists will be supplemented along the track margins. The trail net will enable the access to Tel Aviv center through the river and the park. East of "Eser Tachanot" site, the track will be paved along one bank of the river, while in certain places, along the two banks. The plan was approved by the government and Hayarkon River Authority, its cost is about 10 million NIS. The plan will be carried out by phases.
  • Historic sites along the river:


    Tel Kasila
  • (in English: Kasila Mound)
  • A mound located at the peak of a gravel range, about 150 meters north of Hayarkon River and within 1,750 meters east of Hayarkon estuary, in the area of Eretz Israel Museum. During archeological excavations in the mound, three layers of an ancient settlement were discovered, while the remains from the Iron Age to the Middle Ages were found as part of it. The remains of Philistine Temples, residential buildings, a Samaritan synagogue floor from the Byzantine Age, water wells from various ages and several agricultural facilities were found among the findings. The town was a major port city (already during the Biblical period of the "Judges"), it was founded in 1150 BC and was devastated by a fire in 980 BC (it's possible that the town was ruined by the army of King David). Several ancient items which were found in the site are currently exhibited there. During the First World War, the Turkish army used the mound as an outpost against the British troops. Since the establishment of Israel, the mound had been excavated several times. The excavations began to take place by Prof. Binyamin Mazar, and then continued by Eretz Israel Museum, The Archaeology Institute of The Hebrew University and Israel Exploration Society headed by Prof. Amichay Mazar.


    Tel Jarisa
  • (also known as Napoleon Hill, in English: Jarisa Mound)
  • A mound located on a gravel hill at border of Ramat Gan and Hayarkon Park, a bit south of Hayarkon River. Remains of a major port town from the Canaanite age were discovered at the mound. At that time, the river was flowing right next to the mound, so boats were docking at its foot. Hayarkon River was then a major sailing route. Over the years, the flow route of the river was naturally diverted north. During archeological excavations at the site, several remaining parts of little palaces and a water factory from the Bronze and Iron Ages were discovered. The city was fortified in the south and east directions and protected by Hayarkon and Ayalon Rivers in the north and west directions respectively. Part of the southeast fortification was revealed during the archaeological works. The Canaanite town was devastated in approximately 1,200 BC. Excavations were carried out already during the British Mandate by Prof. A.L. Sukenik, through the years, the excavation were relaunched as an initiative of Tel-Aviv University, by a crew headed by Dr. Ze'ev Hertzog. The mound is located near "Sheva Tachanot" mill site, situated beside the river. The mill site is also known as "Jarisa Mill".


    Tel Kudadi
  • (in English: Kudadi Mound)
  • The mound is situated on the north bank of Hayarkon estuary, next to the sea and the river. Scattered over the mound are the remains of a stronghold from the eighth or ninth century BC (First Temple Period) and ancient buildings, some of them date back to the Iron Age. The nearest spot of the river was crossable by foot, so the stronghold defended the crossing area against invaders. Archeological excavations were carried out during the British Mandate by Prof. A.L. Sukenik, some remains of the buildings were revealed and can be seen nowadays. The construction of Riding Power Plant in the 30's severely damaged the remains of the mound. A memorial pillar monument, on which perpetuated in writing the crossing of Hayarkon River by the British troops, was placed over the remains after the end of the first world war. Furthermore, a small lighthouse was built in 1934 right next to it.


    "Jarisa" Gristmill
  • (also known as "Sheva Tachanot" - Seven Mills in English)
  • "Jarisa" mill, which is situated at the heart of Hayarkon Park, near a small waterfall of the river, was once a mill site consisted of 11 pairs of gristmills, exploiting the streamflow at the site. The mill is very close to Jarisa Mound, which is named after the gristmills. Several examinations carried out at the site revealed that an ancient market was operating nearby the mill. Scattered over the site are the remains of 3 gristmills from the 19th century. Those gristmills were built over the remains of older building. An older mill from the Ottoman Period was operating at the site as well. It's possible that mills were operating at the site already during the Roman Period. A dam, later used as base for the construction of a more modern one, was built on the river, nowadays, it functions as a passage between the two banks of the river. The site is called "Sheva Tachanot" (Seven Mills in English) due to the fact that one of the buildings contained seven grinding facilities. The site was active until the beginning of the 1940's, while a cafe had been operated at the site until the 1930's. Examinations regarding the preservation status and the revealing of the remains belonging to the mills, which were covered by mud and soil as a result of floods over the years, were carried out in 2001. Furthermore, a plan to thoroughly uncover the remains and reconstruct buildings at the site in the future was finalized.


    "Hadar" Gristmill
  • (also known as "Eser Tachanot" - Ten Mills in English)
  • Hadar mill, which is located at the most eastern part of Hayarkon Park, near the bridge over the river that links between Pinchas Rosen st. and the cities of Ramat Gan and Bney Brak, was the largest mill site along Hayarkon River, perhaps even throughout all Israel. Originally, the mill was firstly operating during the Roman Period, and despite the name of "Eser Tachnot" (Ten Mills in English), 20 pairs of gristmills were operating during the most active period at the mill site (The name "Eser Tachanot" was given to the site during the time, when 10 pairs of gristmills were operating). The mill site stopped operating in the First World War, following the attack by the Turkish army, which blew up the dam and the bridge. Remains of buildings at the site are currently covered by vegetation and soil, only the west wall of the northern mill and small part of the southern dam are exposed. During the recent years, Hayarkon River Authority uncovered some parts of the site, an examination at the site determined that the place was well-preserved. A major project, which will reveal the entire site and turn it into a public place, is intended to be carried out in the future.
Hayarkon River: 

The Yarkon river

The Yarkon river, The Yarkon park

The Yarkon river

The Yarkon river

The Yarkon river

The Yarkon river

The Yarkon river

The Yarkon river

The Yarkon river

The Yarkon river

The Yarkon river, The Yarkon park

The Yarkon river

The Yarkon river

A pedestrian bridge over the Yarkon river

The Yarkon river

The Yarkon Estuary

The Yarkon river

A pedestrian bridge over the Yarkon river

The Yarkon river

The Yarkon river

The Yarkon river, The Yarkon park

The Yarkon river, The Yarkon park

Riding power plant and The Yarkon river

A canal which links Hayarkon river to the big lake in Hayarkon park

The Yarkon river

The Yarkon river

The Yarkon river

The Yarkon river

The Yarkon river

The Yarkon river

The Yarkon river

The Yarkon river

The Yarkon river

The Yarkon Estuary

The Yarkon river

The Yarkon river

The Yarkon river

Hayarkon river and the Riding power plant on the background.

The Yarkon river, The Yarkon park

The Yarkon river, The Yarkon park

Daniel Amichay Rowing Center

The Yarkon river

The Yarkon river

The Yarkon river

The Yarkon river, The Yarkon park

The Yarkon river, The Yarkon park

The Yarkon river, The Yarkon park

The Yarkon river

The Yarkon river, The Yarkon park

The Yarkon river

The Yarkon river, The Yarkon park

The Yarkon river

The Yarkon river

A pedestrian bridge over the Yarkon river

The Yarkon river, The Yarkon park

The Yarkon river, The Yarkon park

A pedestrian bridge over the Yarkon river

The Yarkon river, The Yarkon park

Daniel Amichay Rowing Center

The Yarkon river, The Yarkon park

The Yarkon river - Sheva Tachanot site

Wauchope bridge, The Yarkon Estuary

The Yarkon river, The Yarkon park

The Yarkon river - Sheva Tachanot site

The Yarkon river, The Yarkon park

The Yarkon river, The Yarkon park

The Yarkon Estuary beach, the Yarkon peninsula

a walkway along the Yarkon river, the Yarkon peninsula

The Yarkon river

The Yarkon river

HaTa'arucha bridge, the Yarkon river

HaTa'arucha bridge, the Yarkon river

The Yarkon river, The Yarkon park

the Yarkon river, the Yarkon peninsula

The Yarkon river - Sheva Tachanot site

The Maccabia bridge, The Yarkon river

The Yarkon river, The Yarkon park

The Yarkon river, The Yarkon park

The Yarkon river, The Yarkon park

The Yarkon Estuary beach, the Yarkon peninsula

Tel Kasila: 

Tel Qasile

Tel Qasile

Tel Qasile

Tel Qasile

Tel Qasile

Tel Qasile

Tel Jarisa: 

Tel Jarisa

Tel Jarisa

Tel Jarisa

Tel Kudadi: 

Tel Kudadi, The beach promenade, The Yarkon Estuary

"Jarisa" Gristmill: 

The Yarkon river - Sheva Tachanot site

The Yarkon river - Sheva Tachanot site

The Yarkon river - Sheva Tachanot site

The Yarkon river - Sheva Tachanot site

The Yarkon river - Sheva Tachanot site

The Yarkon river - Sheva Tachanot site

The Yarkon river - Sheva Tachanot site

The Yarkon river - Sheva Tachanot site

The Yarkon river - Sheva Tachanot site

The Yarkon river - Sheva Tachanot site

The Yarkon river - Sheva Tachanot site

The Yarkon river - Sheva Tachanot site

The Yarkon river - Sheva Tachanot site

The Yarkon river - Sheva Tachanot site